SOHN – Tremors

SOHN – Tremors

Tremors is the much anticipated debut album by English singer-producer SOHN. As a producer SOHN is known for being able to shroud songs in emotion casting a shadowy atmosphere and deep sensations through layers of strong sound. As a singer he is gentle and melancholy yet passionate; when he has combined his talents in previous EPs the results have been shudderingly heartfelt.

Those who have heard SOHN’s previous releases will know what to expect and will be expecting grate things. The artist has the ability to bring the world to a momentary standstill, pinning you in that moment and sending a chill down your spine. Prior to this album people have drawn justified parallels between himself and James Blake, use of ambient sounds and empty space, the sound of the dust settling in the calm aftermath of dubstep.

Tremors does not contain any surprises, it is what it is; a sad, emotional, sometimes depressing album perfect for those who want to sink into their emotions. Bloodflows is a standout song that emphasizes this submission to feeling, it is a shame it follows one of the weakest songs Artifice. It would have been nice for the first two tracks that draw you in nicely to flow into the beautiful soundscape in Bloodflows but Artifice fails to carry that emotion.

The album does occasionally feel cold and bleak, there are certain songs such as Ransom Notes and fool that pass you by without having that much impact. Bloodflows, Lessons and The Wheel are all songs from previous EPs, other songs such as Red lines and Warnings did not make it on the album and those that have taken their place do not stand up to their standard. The 11 track debut does however end strong, there is a flow and an a accumulation of expression in the last four tracks that dip into more bass infused beats that add a different dimension to SOHN’s gentle voice.

Bloodflows and Red lines would have got many people excited about this debut album, something new and passionate but it may be received as slightly disappointing, at times the feel of this album is a little too bleak to enjoy. However that sensation is what many fans of SOHN will be looking for, music to feel sad within.

 

After Gig Chat With The Surfin’ Birds

In a small, packed bar in the middle of the Falmouth high street, an unfamiliar sound could be heard luring people in. The sound of fifties rock ‘n’ roll colliding with punk and blues made something more fun and energetic. That sound, I found out, was the sound of modern surf music and boy is it entertaining. After an hour of dancing an inch or so from the stage on a small, crowded and overly happy dance floor I interviewed brothers Paul (Singer) and Liam (drummer) with bassist Dave about playing live as their band The Surfin’ Birds.

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Q: What do you think of playing in Falmouth and playing here in toast?

 

Paul: I absolutely love it. There’s a friend of ours who invited us down in the first place, Simon Davis (who I’ve known a long time), so he just invited us down to do one show two years ago, and we come back; this is our fourth time we all gathered a crowd on the way so it’s all good. Every time we come to play its always alright and a good reception and people dig it; they like their surf music.

 

Q: What would you say to people who haven’t seen you play, what you say to expect?

 

Paul: A big, fat, sinister surf sound, it’s not necessarily a surf sound in the traditional concept of it but you’ve got the Fender guitars and the Wang bars and all that from the sixties which I love personally but were trying to revamp it. My brother, he’s into punk, ska and new wave and things like that and then you’ve got Dave on the bass who’s into Motown, James Jamerson and stuff and I love blues and I love blues and surf rock and stuff like that.

 

Q: People were dancing and were packed so close to the band; almost dancing with you. Is that something you look for in a gig?

 

Paul: I love that yeah, when the crowds ten centimetres away and you see them sweat just as much as you that’s a great feeling, of course it is. No matter if you’re playing in front of a thousand people or a hundred people I always prefer the closer crowds.

 

Liam: I like any gigs but I do prefer when it’s more intimate; you do get more of a reaction out of the crowd.

 

Q: What’s you favourite gig to date?

 

Dave: Today, it’s about as far back as I can remember and I’m the driver.

 

Paul: That’s a hard one because different situations, different gigs. One on the nicest ones was when we supported Wanda Jackson because we love Wada Jackson a rockabilly star from the 50s I do know though because I prefer little clubs. Simon has seen us so many times, he’s the one who got us the gig here.

 

Simon: My favourite gig of yours, probably the first time you played here, it wasn’t even the gig it was just playing at my house after.

 

Paul: We went to a student house after and we did a gig for about two and a half hours after and we got a bit pissed.

 

Q: When you  walk away from a gig what makes you think if it was a good gig or not?1653652_585787131506995_1207349579_n

 

Paul: The crowd, we get more into it if it is a crowd that is enjoying it. We’ve been to these gigs were people just stand there at the back and clap and say “oh my God you sound so close to the Sonics or the ventures” fuck that man, we just love the music and we play in our own way.

 

Q: What do you take influence from as a live band?

 

Paul: It’s like psychedelic Punk music, that what I call it. Were into bands like Cream and Hendrix and all those bands from the sixties, the Stooges, we love how they bowed everything together in the mid-sixties garage scene. Garage bands like the Sonics and we are the people. All those kind of bands that put it into a three minuet track. That’s great for an album but live you have to give it something else, you have to play off the sweat of your pants.

 

Dave: All about the crowd if, their into it you can really feed off of it and get in the zone a bit more, when it’s more tame, your tamer in your performance . As influence where trying to bring back the power trio, Cream and all that.

 

Q: What are you doing for the rest of the year?

 

Paul: Were just in the middle of doing an album and were recording that with ambassador records and that will be out around spring time so you can check it out on the internet and check us out on Facebook. We have some gigs coming up and we play all over, last year we played in Sweden and that’s the first time we played away; we had to bring our game to Sweden. That was quite nerve racking for us three country boys.

 

Q: Which do you prefer live or studio work?

 

Paul: Live! I love the studio because you can create, you can think about things and go through things and be bit more creative in that sense but I think live were its more off the cuff is more exciting because you don’t know what’s going to happen next.

 

Q: Does it surprise you that many people from bands prefer studio work?

 

Paul: Not at all, that could be their creative source. My creative source personally being into Blues and Jazz, I like to play and improvise.

 

Liam: With music you have to affect people. I prefer live because when you’re in the studio you’re not performing to anyone; were here to entertain.

 

Dave: Especially in our days how the markets going, an album is used as a tool to get people to go to your gigs, it’s gone on a roundabout circuit.

 

Q: Why should people come and see you live?

 

Paul: I’d say psychedelic surf music. It’s stuff to dance to but be prepared for the unexpected.

 

Liam: it’s not popular music but when you hear it your love it

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